Posts Tagged ‘ballroom dancing instruction’

How to Find The First Beat in Ballroom Dancing

Monday, December 14th, 2009

As one of the mistakes that I used to make regularly in my ballroom dancing was dancing off the beat, I have spent a lot of time learning how to find the beat and in particular recognizing the first beat of a song.

The ability to find the first beat of a song is important when learning how to keep time to music in ballroom dancing. It is a fundamental skill when we learn how to dance. This is because we begin our dance at the beginning beat of the music. As a couple we need to start together in time with the music. And it is the man’s responsibility to begin with the first step of the dance.

What are the differences between beat, rhythm and tempo?

  • a beat is the basic time unit of a piece of music.
  • the rhythm of a song is made up of a sequence of beats.
  • the tempo is the speed at which the beats occur.

How to find the first beat?

I have learned three ways for picking out the first beat:

  1. Listen for when the singer begins to sing. Singers tend to sing on the first beat of any new sequence of music.
  2. Listen for the beat that has a greater intensity or volume than the others. This is often the first beat.
  3. Listen for the bass line in the drums or bass guitar. The first beat of a bar has slightly more emphasis and can be clearly heard in the bass.

How to master finding the beat?

In the same way as knowing what dance to do to the music, I have found that finding the first beat takes practice. It requires listening to a variety of music regularly and listening for the different intensity of the beats. The first beat may or may not be louder than others, but it does have a presence. I have come to know it when I hear it.

For me it is not easy; it is challenging. But as soon as I am able to consistently pick out the beat of a particular song, I find that my ability to keep time to music improves measurably. Over time and with practice, I have found that I can feel where the first beat is in a favourite piece of ballroom music.

There even comes a point where I don’t have to rely on hearing that first beat to find the beat of a favourite song. I can just feel it as I am dancing the dance steps.

I find that it helps me to learn to dance by using all of my senses in the dance classes and practice sessions.

Finding the beat exercise

Now it is time to put into practice what you have just learned.

1) Watch and listen to this Finding the Salsa Beat video:

2) Now listen for the beat in the youtube video of Norah Jones singing Come Away With Me (listen for ‘1-2-3′ and ‘quick-quick – slow’.

3) Now find the beat in the following video of Sex Bomb by Tom Jones (listen for ‘1-2-3-cha-cha’ and ‘slow – quick-quick – slow':

How to Hear The Music and Know What Dance to Do

Monday, December 14th, 2009

As ballroom dancing comes from music, it is all about recognizing the fundamental elements of timing and rhythm. Each dance, such as the Foxtrot, Waltz and Rumba, expresses the rhythm and timing of the music that the dance was created for.

We dance to the rhythm of the song, not its melody nor the words. This is a skill that can be learned. Being able to recognize the rhythm of a song is the way to hear the music and know what dance to do. The ability to recognize the same musical elements in your favourite dance music (e.g. cha cha cha) is an important learning for beginners to ballroom dancing.

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How do we start to recognize these elements?

We listen for the bass line to discern the timing of the music. Play one of your favourites songs to dance to and listen for the consistent beat of the drum, percussion or bass guitar.  Turn up the bass on your stereo and turn down the treble in order to hear the bass line more clearly and aid your ability to clearly hear the rhythm of the music.

The first thing to realize is that it is possible to hear the differences between songs for the different dances. We can hear the difference between a jive, a tango and a rumba. Each dance was developed to match its own music. The more songs we listen to, the more we will be able to identify the music type and what dance to do to it. By listening and dancing to many different songs, we will unconsciously learn the differences between music types.

When beginning, it is helpful to listen and dance to songs that have a strict tempo e.g. the music of Glen Miller. Strict tempo is a consistent and dependable beat – the number of beats and bars remain the same throughout the song. I find that dancing to songs with a dependable beat makes dancing more enjoyable. It is therefore vital that we learn how to find the beat in a song.

For some suggested songs to practice dancing to, read my article on ballroom dancing music.

Music for Ballroom Dancing

Tuesday, August 25th, 2009

Apparently, the last thing that men pay attention to when they are learning to dance is the music. This is because they are more focused on learning the following fundamentals:

  • How to do the steps
  • How to lead the steps
  • How the frame feels when doing it right

I have found that this is true for me at first. As a beginner to ballroom dancing, I do need to understand the pattern before leading someone else. I believe that a solid understanding of the fundamentals is essential. (This was the case when I was learning rock climbing, golf and soccer.)

However, once I have learned the basic footwork I find that I learn more quickly when the music I am dancing to has a clear beat and I know what the timing of the music is. When I can feel the rhythm timing in my body, I find that I can do the steps to the music more easily. I also feel like I know what I am doing because my partner and I are dancing to the music.

As a beginner, some music seems easier to dance to than others.

Liking the music really helps me to be on time with the music. I have been buying songs that I like – where the timing is clear –  so that I can practice what I have learned in a lesson in a fun way at home. I often listen to this music while doing things around the house so that I learn the timing of the music without conscious effort. For more on this, read my article How to Hear the Music and Know What Dance to Do.

I have listed the songs that I like for each dance below. I will update this list as I go.

Cha Cha

  • Sex Bomb - Reload – Mousse T & Tom Jones
  • I Wanna Dance - Afro-Disiac- Willy Chirino
  • Kiss Me Honey Honey – Shirley Bassey
  • You spin me round – Dead or Alive
  • I’m gonna getcha good – Shania Twain

Foxtrot

  • The Pink Panther - 100 Greatest Film Themes –  The City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra
  • Sixteen Tons – 100 Hits: Rock & roll 1950’s – Graham BLVD
  • Walking my baby back home – Nat King Cole

Jive

  • Hit the Road Jack - Anthology -Ray Charles
  • Wake Me up Before You Go Go - Make it Big – Wham
  • Candyman – Back to Basics – Christina Aguilera
  • Jack is Back – C’lan
  • Hound Dog - Elvis Presley

Mambo

  • Baby Keep Smiling – A Little Bit of Mambo – Lou Bega
  • Mambo No 5 – A Little Bit of Mambo – Lou Bega

Rumba

  • Perhaps, Perhaps, Perhaps -
  • Under the Boardwalk -
  • Take my breath away – Berlin

Salsa

  • Corazon Espinado – Ultimate Santana –  Santana

Tango (American)

  • La Comparsita
  • Libertango – Sharon Shannon and Kirsty Macoll

Waltz

  • Come Away With Me – Come Away With Me – Nora Jones

The Dancesport site can help you find more music.